SHELEM

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SHELEM

Jaredite GN		Mountain in Old World, “which they called” Shelem “because of its exceeding height” (Ether 3:1)

No etymology is suggested.

If Semitic languages can be appealed to for Jaredite eytmologies, then Hebrew šelem could supply the root. The name occurs in the PN Shelemiah, with the suffixed 
theophoric element for Jehovah. The meaning most likely comes from common Semitic šlm, “peace,” but as far as I am aware the segholate form of this root is 
*unattested outside the PNs. 

Other names possibly connected with this root include šlmyhw, a name on seals from Arad, 7th c. BC (IDAM No. 679838) and Jerusalem, 7th–6th c. BC (Israel Mus. No. 
71-46.88) (JAT); šelōmōh  Solomon, ʾab-šālōm, Absalom, ʾabī-sālōm, Abishalom (JAT).114 

Unlikely are the suggestions to derive Shelem from Arabic and Hebrew sullām, “ladder, stairway, elevation,” might fit the Book of Mormon statement regarding how the 
mountain received its name. (LID, 243). However, both Hebrew and Arabic have s and not š, while Shellem seems to require š (JAT). Most unlikely is the suggestion that 
the name is composed of the relative particle še and ʿalem or ʿelam, “upon, over; high; highland; etc.” (RFS). First of all, the form proposed does not exist, and the root 
meaning “to ascend,” ʿlh, would leave the m unaccounted for (JAT). It is also unlikely that “exceeding height” can be derived from Semitic šlm, “peace,” meaning “a high 
place with the idea of safety and hence peace” (WJ, 243).

Cf. Book of Mormon Shilom, Salem, Sherem 

114 It is possible that *Assyrian šulmanu, šalamnu, “peace-offering, sacrifice to God” may be related to this root; cf. Hebrew lm (RFS)