Difference between revisions of "LURAM"

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'''Etymology'''
 
'''Etymology'''
  
The name element ''lrm'' forms part of an Aramaic [[Personal Name|PN]], ''ʼdnlrm'', found on a seal during the Hama, Syria, excavations. The same [[Personal Name|PN]] “is known from graffiti on three eighth-century bricks from” Hama. Nahman Avigad with some uncertainty transliterates the name as “Adanluram.” <ref>Nahman Avigad, ''Corpus of West Semitic Stamp Seals'', revised and completed by Benjamin Sass (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1997), 285, n. 760.  [[John A. Tvedtnes|John Tvedtnes]], [[John Gee]], and [[Matthew Roper]] first drew attention to this name in [[The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints|LDS]] circles in their article, “Book of Mormon Names Attested in Ancient Hebrew Inscriptions,” [[Journal of Book of Mormon Studies|''JBMS'']] 9/1 (2000):49.</ref> This Aramaic [[Personal Name|PN]] appears to consist of three parts, ''ʼdn'', which means “master” or “lord;” '' l'', which is probably the precative<ref>For the use of ''lû'' as a precative particle, see [[Wilhelm Gesenius, Gesenius' Hebrew grammar. E. Kautzsch, ed. A. Cowley trans. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press, 1910/ reprint Dover, 2006.|''Gesenius' Hebrew Grammar'']] §159''l'',''m'', and ''x''.</ref> or asseverative particle ''lû'', and the stative verb '' rūm'',<ref>The same stative verb ''rūm'' appears in the biblical names Ram ([http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/ruth/4.19?lang=eng#18 Ruth 4:19]) and Abram.</ref> meaning “lifted up, exalted.” '''L<small>URAM</small>''' would then mean in the precative “May he be exalted” ([[Paul Y. Hoskisson|PYH]]), or in the asseverative, “Surely he is exalted” ([[John A. Tvedtnes|JAT]]).
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The name element ''lrm'' forms part of an Aramaic [[Personal Name|PN]], ''ʼdnlrm'', found on a seal during the Hama, Syria, excavations. This [[Personal Name|PN]] “is known," according to the late Israeli archaeologist Nahman Avigad, "from graffiti on three eighth-century bricks from” Hama, which Avigad with some uncertainty transliterated as “Adanluram.”<ref>Nahman Avigad, ''Corpus of West Semitic Stamp Seals'', revised and completed by Benjamin Sass (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1997), 285, n. 760.  John Tvedtnes, John Gee, and Matthew Roper first drew attention to this name in LDS circles in their article, “Book of Mormon Names Attested in Ancient Hebrew Inscriptions,” ''[[Journal of Book of Mormon Studies|JBMS]]'' 9/1 (2000):49.</ref> This Aramaic [[Personal Name|PN]] appears to consist of three parts, ''ʼdn'', which means “master” or “lord;” '''', which is probably the precative<ref>[[Koehler, Ludwig, and Walter Baumgartner, The Hebrew and Aramaic Lexicon of the Old Testament. 5 vols. revised by W. Baumgartner and Johann J. Stamm. Leiden: Brill, 1994. trans. of 5-volume 3rd German edition.|''HALOT'']], sub לו. For a discussion of the use of ''lû'' as a precative particle, see [[Wilhelm Gesenius, Gesenius' Hebrew grammar. E. Kautzsch, ed. A. Cowley trans. Oxford, England: Clarendon Press, 1910/ reprint Dover, 2006.|''GKC'']] §159''l'', ''m'', and ''x''.</ref> or asseverative particle ''lû'', and the stative verb ''rūm'',<ref>The same stative verb ''rūm'' appears in the biblical names Ram ([https://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/ruth/4.19?lang=eng#18 Ruth 4:19]) and Abram.</ref> meaning “lifted up, exalted.” '''L<small>URAM</small>''' would then mean in the precative “May he be exalted” ([[Paul Y. Hoskisson|PYH]]), or in the asseverative, “Surely he is exalted” ([[John A. Tvedtnes|JAT]]). '''L<small>URAM</small>''' could possibly then be a hypocoristic form for the hypothetical fuller name ''luramel'' or ''luramyahu'' "God/Jehovah is surely exalted."
  
Less likely is a mixed name containing the Sumerian word for “man,” LÚ, and the Akkadian word for “exalted,” ''rām''. Such mixing of languages in ancient Near Eastern names is rather unlikely.<ref>I am not aware of a single instance of mixed language names. The Akkadian word ''lumaḫḫu'', a high ranking priest or purification priest ([[Chicago Assyrian Dictionary = Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the Univ. of Chicago. Chicago: Oriental Institute/Glückstadt: J. J. Augustin, 1956-2010.|''Chicago Assyrian Dictionary'']] L 9:244) is not a name; it is a title. And it is not a mixed name because both elements, ''lu'' and ''maḫ'' are borrowed from Sumerian into Akkadian.</ref>
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'''L<small>URAM</small>''' as a mixed name containing the Sumerian word for “man,” LÚ, and the Akkadian word for “exalted,” ''rām'' is somewhat less likely. Such mixing of languages in ancient Near Eastern names is quite uncommon.<ref>Paul Hoskisson is not aware of a single instance of mixed language names before the Persian conquest. The Akkadian word ''lumaḫḫu'', a high ranking priest or purification priest ([[Chicago Assyrian Dictionary = Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the Univ. of Chicago. Chicago: Oriental Institute/Glückstadt: J. J. Augustin, 1956-2010.|''CAD'']] L 9:244) is not a name; it is a title. And it is not a mixed name because both elements, '''' and ''maḫ'' are Sumerian and were borrowed as a unit into Akkadian.</ref> The derivation of '''L<small>URAM</small>''' from the Akkadian noun ''lurmû'' “pomegranate (tree),”<ref>[[Chicago Assyrian Dictionary = Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the Univ. of Chicago. Chicago: Oriental Institute/Glückstadt: J. J. Augustin, 1956-2010.|''CAD'']] L, 9:255.</ref> is also somewhat unlikely.
 
 
Much less likely is a derivation from Akkadian ''lurmû'' “pomegranate (tree).”<ref>[[Chicago Assyrian Dictionary = Assyrian Dictionary of the Oriental Institute of the Univ. of Chicago. Chicago: Oriental Institute/Glückstadt: J. J. Augustin, 1956-2010.|''Chicago Assyrian Dictionary'']] L, 9:255.</ref>
 
  
 
See [[RAMEUMPTOM|R<small>AMEUMPTOM</small>]], [[RAMAH|R<small>AMAH</small>]], [[RAMATH|R<small>AMATH</small>]].
 
See [[RAMEUMPTOM|R<small>AMEUMPTOM</small>]], [[RAMAH|R<small>AMAH</small>]], [[RAMATH|R<small>AMATH</small>]].
<div style="text-align: right;">[[Stephen D. Ricks|SDR]] and [[Paul Y. Hoskisson|PYH]]</div>
 
  
 
See also [[Luram / Laram Variants]]
 
See also [[Luram / Laram Variants]]
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[[Category:Names]][[Category:Lehite PN]]
 
[[Category:Names]][[Category:Lehite PN]]
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<div style="text-align: center;"> [[LUCIFER|<<]] Luram [[MADMENAH|>>]] </div>
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==[[Name Index]]==
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<big>
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{|border="0" cellpadding="1" width="100%pt"
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|<font color="lightgray">F</font>
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|[[G]]
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|[[H]]
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|[[I]]
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|[[J]]
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|[[K]]
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|[[L]]
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|[[M]]
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|[[N]]
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|[[O]]
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|[[P]]
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|<font color="lightgray">Q</font>
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|[[R]]
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|[[S]]
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|[[T]]
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|[[U]]
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|<font color="lightgray">V</font>
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|<font color="lightgray">W</font>
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|<font color="lightgray">X</font>
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|<font color="lightgray">Y</font>
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|[[Z]]
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|}

Latest revision as of 19:09, 17 February 2017

Lehite PN 1. NEPHITE soldier, 4th c. AD (Moroni 9:2)

Etymology

The name element lrm forms part of an Aramaic PN, ʼdnlrm, found on a seal during the Hama, Syria, excavations. This PN “is known," according to the late Israeli archaeologist Nahman Avigad, "from graffiti on three eighth-century bricks from” Hama, which Avigad with some uncertainty transliterated as “Adanluram.”[1] This Aramaic PN appears to consist of three parts, ʼdn, which means “master” or “lord;” , which is probably the precative[2] or asseverative particle , and the stative verb rūm,[3] meaning “lifted up, exalted.” LURAM would then mean in the precative “May he be exalted” (PYH), or in the asseverative, “Surely he is exalted” (JAT). LURAM could possibly then be a hypocoristic form for the hypothetical fuller name luramel or luramyahu "God/Jehovah is surely exalted."

LURAM as a mixed name containing the Sumerian word for “man,” LÚ, and the Akkadian word for “exalted,” rām is somewhat less likely. Such mixing of languages in ancient Near Eastern names is quite uncommon.[4] The derivation of LURAM from the Akkadian noun lurmû “pomegranate (tree),”[5] is also somewhat unlikely.

See RAMEUMPTOM, RAMAH, RAMATH.

See also Luram / Laram Variants

Variants

Laram

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐢𐐆𐐅𐐡𐐊𐐣 (lɪuːrʌm)

Notes


  1. Nahman Avigad, Corpus of West Semitic Stamp Seals, revised and completed by Benjamin Sass (Jerusalem: Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities, 1997), 285, n. 760. John Tvedtnes, John Gee, and Matthew Roper first drew attention to this name in LDS circles in their article, “Book of Mormon Names Attested in Ancient Hebrew Inscriptions,” JBMS 9/1 (2000):49.
  2. HALOT, sub לו. For a discussion of the use of as a precative particle, see GKC §159l, m, and x.
  3. The same stative verb rūm appears in the biblical names Ram (Ruth 4:19) and Abram.
  4. Paul Hoskisson is not aware of a single instance of mixed language names before the Persian conquest. The Akkadian word lumaḫḫu, a high ranking priest or purification priest (CAD L 9:244) is not a name; it is a title. And it is not a mixed name because both elements, and maḫ are Sumerian and were borrowed as a unit into Akkadian.
  5. CAD L, 9:255.
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