Difference between revisions of "GAD"

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Zevot, Ziony. Matres Lectionis in Ancient Hebrew Epigraphs. Cambridge, Mass.: ASOR, 1980.
 
Zevot, Ziony. Matres Lectionis in Ancient Hebrew Epigraphs. Cambridge, Mass.: ASOR, 1980.
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[[Category:Names]]

Revision as of 20:15, 4 May 2011

GAD

Lehite GN 1. City, burned with fire ca. 34 AD, along with LAMAN, JOSH, and KISHKUMEN (3 Nephi 9:10)

It is most likely that this NEPHITE GN comes from the PN of the first person who settled the city. The root gād in Hebrew means “fortune, luck, riches, etc.,” and is quite common in Hebrew, including GAD, one of the twelve sons of JACOB (ISRAEL). Footnote 1. The name appears in texts near the time of LEHI (JAT). Footnote 2.

Less likely, though not impossible is gd, “coriander.” For an example of a Near Eastern GN coming from a plant, see the Arabic GN Ras Shamra, “cape fennel” (JH).

Cf. Book of Mormon GID, AMGID, AMNIGADDAH, GADIANDI, GADIANTON/GADDIANTON, GADIOMNAH, et al.

Notes


Bibliography

Albright, William F. Yahweh and the Gods of Canaan: A Historical Analysis of Two Contrasting Faiths. Doubleday, 1968.

Hobbs, T. R. “Gadi,” in D. N. Freedman, ed., Anchor Bible Dictionary, 6 vols., II: 868. NY: Doubleday, 1992.

Maier, Walter, III. “Gad (Deity),” in D. N. Freedman, ed., Anchor Bible Dictionary, 6 vols., II: 863–64. NY: Doubleday, 1992.

Zevot, Ziony. Matres Lectionis in Ancient Hebrew Epigraphs. Cambridge, Mass.: ASOR, 1980.