Difference between revisions of "DESERET"

From Book of Mormon Onomasticon
Jump to: navigation, search
m
Line 10: Line 10:
 
Until possible language affinities for [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names, especially if it is possible that some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names were translated into [[NEPHITE(S)|N<small>EPHITE</small>]], or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.
 
Until possible language affinities for [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names, especially if it is possible that some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names were translated into [[NEPHITE(S)|N<small>EPHITE</small>]], or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.
  
The Book of Mormon supplies its own meaning for this word. Since the [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] relationship with known languages has not been well established.
+
The Book of Mormon supplies its own meaning for this word.
  
If [[EGYPT|E<small>GYPTIAN</small>]] may be appealed to, ''dšr.t'', “red (land),” the name of Upper [[EGYPT|E<small>GYPT</small>]], of which the symbol was the bee, and the king’s crown (the ''dšr.t''-crown) was an  
+
If [[EGYPT|E<small>GYPTIAN</small>]] may be appealed to, ''dšr.t'', “red (land), desert” as well as a name for Upper [[EGYPT|E<small>GYPT</small>]], of which the symbol was the bee, and the king’s crown (the ''dšr.t''-crown) was an  
elongated beehive shape (and peasant houses were similarly shaped). <ref>[[Hugh W. Nibley|Nibley, Hugh W.]], “There were Jaredites III,” (Improvement Era, April 1965).</ref> Also, ''dsrt'' = “archaic and ritual  
+
elongated beehive shape (and peasant houses were similarly shaped). <ref>[[Hugh W. Nibley|Nibley, Hugh W.]], “There were Jaredites III,” ''Improvement Era'', (April 1965).</ref> Also, ''dsrt'' = “archaic and ritual  
 
designation of the bee was ‘'''D<small>ESERET'''’</small>, a ‘word of power’, too sacred to be entrusted to the vulgar.”<ref>[[Hugh W. Nibley|Nibley]], ''World of the Jaredites'', (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book: 1988) p. 192.</ref>
 
designation of the bee was ‘'''D<small>ESERET'''’</small>, a ‘word of power’, too sacred to be entrusted to the vulgar.”<ref>[[Hugh W. Nibley|Nibley]], ''World of the Jaredites'', (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book: 1988) p. 192.</ref>
  
[[Janne M. Sjodahl|Sjodahl]], Authenticity of the Book of Mormon, p.11 : [[HEBREW|H<small>EBREW</small>]], ''asher'' = “happiness, blessedness;” and ''ashur'' = “one that is happy.”  
+
Kevin Barney explained the etymology as Proto-Semitic or Archaic Hebrew GN ''dbrt'' (Joshua 19:12  > Classical Hebrew ''dĕbôrâ'' “bee; Deborah”), which may have been equated or confused with ancient Egyptian ''dšrt,''<ref>Barney, “On the Etymology of Deseret,” ''By Common Consent Papers'' 1/2 (Nov 2006): 3-6, cited in Book of Mormon Central, “Where Does the Word ‘Deseret’ Come From? (Ether 2:3),” ''KnoWhy'' #236 (Nov 22, 2016), nn. 7-9,  online at https://knowhy.bookofmormoncentral.org/content/ where-does-the-word-%E2%80%9Cdeseret%E2%80%9D-come-from ; even Hirsch Miller used Hebrew ''dĕbôrîm'' “honey-bees” as his 1922 translation of DESERET.</ref> with the above meaning discussed by Nibley, but which can also mean "desert."<ref>Ramy Samir Mina, “The Influence of the Ancient Egyptian Language on the European Languages,” master’s thesis (Cairo University, 2005), Table 1.</ref>
 +
 
 +
Cf. Janne [[Janne M. Sjodahl|Sjodahl]]: [[HEBREW|H<small>EBREW</small>]], ''asher'' = “happiness, blessedness;” and ''ashur'' = “one that is happy.”<ref>Sjodahl, ''Authenticity of the Book of Mormon'', p.11.</ref>
  
 
See also [[Deseret Variant]]
 
See also [[Deseret Variant]]

Revision as of 02:21, 29 April 2020

Jaredite noun 1. “Honey-bee” (Ether 2:3)

Etymology

Until possible language affinities for JAREDITE names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of JAREDITE names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some JAREDITE names, especially if it is possible that some JAREDITE names were translated into NEPHITE, or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.

The Book of Mormon supplies its own meaning for this word.

If EGYPTIAN may be appealed to, dšr.t, “red (land), desert” as well as a name for Upper EGYPT, of which the symbol was the bee, and the king’s crown (the dšr.t-crown) was an elongated beehive shape (and peasant houses were similarly shaped). [1] Also, dsrt = “archaic and ritual designation of the bee was ‘DESERET, a ‘word of power’, too sacred to be entrusted to the vulgar.”[2]

Kevin Barney explained the etymology as Proto-Semitic or Archaic Hebrew GN dbrt (Joshua 19:12 > Classical Hebrew dĕbôrâ “bee; Deborah”), which may have been equated or confused with ancient Egyptian dšrt,[3] with the above meaning discussed by Nibley, but which can also mean "desert."[4]

Cf. Janne Sjodahl: HEBREW, asher = “happiness, blessedness;” and ashur = “one that is happy.”[5]

See also Deseret Variant

Variants

Deseret

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐔𐐇𐐝𐐀𐐡𐐇𐐓 (dɛsiːrɛt)

Notes


  1. Nibley, Hugh W., “There were Jaredites III,” Improvement Era, (April 1965).
  2. Nibley, World of the Jaredites, (Salt Lake City: Deseret Book: 1988) p. 192.
  3. Barney, “On the Etymology of Deseret,” By Common Consent Papers 1/2 (Nov 2006): 3-6, cited in Book of Mormon Central, “Where Does the Word ‘Deseret’ Come From? (Ether 2:3),” KnoWhy #236 (Nov 22, 2016), nn. 7-9, online at https://knowhy.bookofmormoncentral.org/content/ where-does-the-word-%E2%80%9Cdeseret%E2%80%9D-come-from ; even Hirsch Miller used Hebrew dĕbôrîm “honey-bees” as his 1922 translation of DESERET.
  4. Ramy Samir Mina, “The Influence of the Ancient Egyptian Language on the European Languages,” master’s thesis (Cairo University, 2005), Table 1.
  5. Sjodahl, Authenticity of the Book of Mormon, p.11.

Bibliography


  • Daniel H. Ludlow A Companion to your Study of the Book of Mormon. Provo, UT: Brigham Young University Press, 1969.
<< Deseret >>

Name Index

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z