Difference between revisions of "AMMARON"

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'''Etymology'''
  
'''Etymology'''
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'''AMMARON''' could be a variant of [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]]. (The [[Deseret Alphabet]] transcriptions are identical.) If however the doubled /m/ is intentional, then '''A<small>MMARON</small>''' might not be a variant of [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]]. For the first possibility, see the entry [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]].
  
'''AMMARON''' could be a variant of [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]] (see above). However, if the double ''m'' is to be taken seriously, then ''ʿm ʾrwn'', “people of the ark,” is not impossible ([[Jo Ann Hackett|JH]]), but hardly plausible.
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If the doubled /m/ is phonemic, it is possible that '''A<small>MMARON</small>''', like [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]], could well be connected with the West Semitic root ''ʾmr'', “to speak, to say; word.”<ref>Examples of this Hebrew root appearing in biblical PNs include ''ʾmryh'', Amariah and ''ʾmry'', Imri. The Ammonite PN ''ʾmrʾl'' (''AL'', p. 95.) and the Ugaritic PN ''a-mar-<sup>d</sup>addu'' (Gröndahl, p. 37.).</ref> The form could stem from the common Semitic noun pattern for professions, C<sub>1</sub>AC<sub>2</sub>C<sub>2</sub>ĀC<sub>3</sub>, yielding the form ''ʾammār'', which would mean someone who works with words, and/or with the hypocoristic suffix –''ōn''<ref>''IPN'', p. 38.</ref> (such as the biblical PNs Amnon and Sampson), could mean, “word smith/speaker.Both [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]] and '''A<small>MARON</small>''' were [[NEPHITE(S)|N<small>EPHITE</small>]] scribes/historians, though separated in time by many centuries.
  
'''A<small>MMARON</small>''' is also spelled [[AMORON|A<small>MORON</small>]] (OM [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/54/1#1 Alma 54:1]) and [[AMMORON|A<small>MMORON</small>]] (OM and PM [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/54/16,23#16 Alma 54:16, 23]; [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/55/1-2#1 55:1–2]; [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/56/18,20#18 56:18, 20]; [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/57/1,3#1 57:1, 3]; [http://scriptures.lds.org/en/alma/59/7 59:7]).
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Because this name is also spelled ''[[AMORON|A<small>MORON</small>]]''<ref>[http://www.lds.org/scriptures/bofm/alma/54.1?lang=eng#primary Alma 54:1] in the original manuscript.</ref>, and ''[[AMMORON|A<small>MMORON</small>]]''<ref>[http://www.lds.org/scriptures/bofm/alma/54.16,%2023?lang=eng#15 Alma 54:16, 23] in the original manuscript and printer’s manuscript. See the variants link for other citations.</ref>, it may be related to those two PNs.
  
It is interesting that both [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]] and '''A<small>MMARON</small>''' were [[NEPHITE(S)|N<small>EPHITE</small>]] scribes/historians, though separated in time by many centuries ([[John A. Tvedtnes|JAT]]).
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Less likely, but not impossible, is biblical [[HEBREW|H<small>EBREW</small>]] ''ʿam-ʾărôn'', “people of the ark” ([[Jo Ann Hackett|JH]]).
  
See Book of Mormon [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]], [[AMMORON|A<small>MMORON</small>]], [[AMORON|A<small>MORON</small>]], [[MORON|M<small>ORON</small>]], [[MORONI|M<small>ORONI</small>]], [[MORONIHAH|M<small>ORONIHAH</small>]], [[EMRON|E<small>MRON</small>]], [[EMER|E<small>MER</small>]], [[OMER|O<small>MER</small>]], [[AMULEK|A<small>MULEK</small>]] (vs. [[MULEK|M<small>ULEK</small>]])
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Cf. Book of Mormon [[AMARON|A<small>MARON</small>]], [[AMMORON|A<small>MMORON</small>]], [[AMORON|A<small>MORON</small>]], [[MORONI|M<small>ORONI</small>]], [[MORONIHAH|M<small>ORONIHAH</small>]], [[EMER|E<small>MER</small>]], [[OMER|O<small>MER</small>]], [[AMULEK|A<small>MULEK</small>]] (vs. [[MULEK|M<small>ULEK</small>]])
  
 
See also [[Ammaron / Ammoron Variant]]
 
See also [[Ammaron / Ammoron Variant]]
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<div style="text-align: right;">[[Paul Y. Hoskisson|PYH]]</div>
  
 
'''Variants'''
 
'''Variants'''
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'''Notes'''
 
'''Notes'''
 
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<references/>
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[[Category:Names]][[Category:Lehite PN]]
 
[[Category:Names]][[Category:Lehite PN]]

Revision as of 17:24, 15 November 2013

Lehite PN 1. Historian, ca. 306 AD (4 Nephi 1:47, 48, 49; Mormon 1:2 (x2), 5; 2:17 (x3); 4:23)

Etymology

AMMARON could be a variant of AMARON. (The Deseret Alphabet transcriptions are identical.) If however the doubled /m/ is intentional, then AMMARON might not be a variant of AMARON. For the first possibility, see the entry AMARON.

If the doubled /m/ is phonemic, it is possible that AMMARON, like AMARON, could well be connected with the West Semitic root ʾmr, “to speak, to say; word.”[1] The form could stem from the common Semitic noun pattern for professions, C1AC2C2ĀC3, yielding the form ʾammār, which would mean someone who works with words, and/or with the hypocoristic suffix –ōn[2] (such as the biblical PNs Amnon and Sampson), could mean, “word smith/speaker.” Both AMARON and AMARON were NEPHITE scribes/historians, though separated in time by many centuries.

Because this name is also spelled AMORON[3], and AMMORON[4], it may be related to those two PNs.

Less likely, but not impossible, is biblical HEBREW ʿam-ʾărôn, “people of the ark” (JH).

Cf. Book of Mormon AMARON, AMMORON, AMORON, MORONI, MORONIHAH, EMER, OMER, AMULEK (vs. MULEK)

See also Ammaron / Ammoron Variant

PYH

Variants

Ammoron

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐈𐐣𐐈𐐡𐐊𐐤 (æmærʌn)

Notes


  1. Examples of this Hebrew root appearing in biblical PNs include ʾmryh, Amariah and ʾmry, Imri. The Ammonite PN ʾmrʾl (AL, p. 95.) and the Ugaritic PN a-mar-daddu (Gröndahl, p. 37.).
  2. IPN, p. 38.
  3. Alma 54:1 in the original manuscript.
  4. Alma 54:16, 23 in the original manuscript and printer’s manuscript. See the variants link for other citations.