Difference between revisions of "AGOSH"

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'''Etymology'''
 
'''Etymology'''
  
While the origin of the [[JAREDITE|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] language is quite uncertain and etymologies for [[JAREDITE|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names must remain speculative, some suggestions about the origin of these names may still be proposed. One may compare, for example, the eponymous Aramean [[Geographical Name|GN]] Bit Agush<ref>Alan R. Millard, “Abraham,” in ed. David N. Freedman, ''Anchor Bible Dictionary'' ((New York: Doubleday, 1992), 1:38.</ref> (Bit Agusi) from Arpad in west Syria.<ref>E. Meyers, ed., ''Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East'' (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), 1:85-86, 5:132.</ref> '''A<small>GOSH</small>''' may be related to [[AKISH|A<small>KISH</small>]], since they are in the same vicinity and may be variant stems of the same root and express a common quality.
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Until possible language affinities for [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names, especially if it is possible that some [[JAREDITES|J<small>AREDITE</small>]] names were translated into [[NEPHITE(S)|N<small>EPHITE</small>]], or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.
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One may compare, for example, the eponymous Aramean [[Geographical Name|GN]] Bit Agush<ref>Alan R. Millard, “Abraham,” in ed. David N. Freedman, ''Anchor Bible Dictionary'' ((New York: Doubleday, 1992), 1:38.</ref> (Bit Agusi) from Arpad in west Syria.<ref>E. Meyers, ed., ''Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East'' (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), 1:85-86, 5:132.</ref> '''A<small>GOSH</small>''' may be related to [[AKISH|A<small>KISH</small>]], since they are in the same vicinity and may be variant stems of the same root and express a common quality.
  
 
Some Sumerian and Akkadian etymologies may also be proposed for '''A<small>GOSH</small>''': (1) Sumerian ''UKÚŠ'', ''ukuš<sub>2</sub>, u<sub>2</sub>-kuš<sub>8</sub>'' “cucumber, squash, gourd” = Akkadian ''qiššû'' = Hebrew ''qiššû’'' “cucumber” ([http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/num/11.5?lang=eng#4 Numbers 11:5]); and (2) Sumerian ''akuš'', akuš, ''a<sub>2</sub>-kuš<sub>3</sub>''; ''a<sub>2</sub>-1(diš)-kuš''= Akkadian ''ammatu'' “forearm; cubit.”<ref>Hayim Tawil, ''An Akkadian Lexical Companion for Biblical Hebrew'' (Jersey City, NJ: [[(Jewish Publisher)|KTAV]], 2009), 23-4.</ref> In connection with the name '''A<small>GOSH</small>''' one may also compare the Old Babylonian ''Hymn of Agushaya'' about Ishtar/Inanna.<ref>Tikva Frymer-Kensky, ''In the Wake of the Goddesses'' (New York: Free Press, 1992), 30-1, 67, 78.</ref>
 
Some Sumerian and Akkadian etymologies may also be proposed for '''A<small>GOSH</small>''': (1) Sumerian ''UKÚŠ'', ''ukuš<sub>2</sub>, u<sub>2</sub>-kuš<sub>8</sub>'' “cucumber, squash, gourd” = Akkadian ''qiššû'' = Hebrew ''qiššû’'' “cucumber” ([http://www.lds.org/scriptures/ot/num/11.5?lang=eng#4 Numbers 11:5]); and (2) Sumerian ''akuš'', akuš, ''a<sub>2</sub>-kuš<sub>3</sub>''; ''a<sub>2</sub>-1(diš)-kuš''= Akkadian ''ammatu'' “forearm; cubit.”<ref>Hayim Tawil, ''An Akkadian Lexical Companion for Biblical Hebrew'' (Jersey City, NJ: [[(Jewish Publisher)|KTAV]], 2009), 23-4.</ref> In connection with the name '''A<small>GOSH</small>''' one may also compare the Old Babylonian ''Hymn of Agushaya'' about Ishtar/Inanna.<ref>Tikva Frymer-Kensky, ''In the Wake of the Goddesses'' (New York: Free Press, 1992), 30-1, 67, 78.</ref>

Revision as of 22:45, 10 September 2015

Jaredite GN 1. Plains (Ether 14:15, 16)

Etymology

Until possible language affinities for JAREDITE names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of JAREDITE names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some JAREDITE names, especially if it is possible that some JAREDITE names were translated into NEPHITE, or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.

One may compare, for example, the eponymous Aramean GN Bit Agush[1] (Bit Agusi) from Arpad in west Syria.[2] AGOSH may be related to AKISH, since they are in the same vicinity and may be variant stems of the same root and express a common quality.

Some Sumerian and Akkadian etymologies may also be proposed for AGOSH: (1) Sumerian UKÚŠ, ukuš2, u2-kuš8 “cucumber, squash, gourd” = Akkadian qiššû = Hebrew qiššû’ “cucumber” (Numbers 11:5); and (2) Sumerian akuš, akuš, a2-kuš3; a2-1(diš)-kuš= Akkadian ammatu “forearm; cubit.”[3] In connection with the name AGOSH one may also compare the Old Babylonian Hymn of Agushaya about Ishtar/Inanna.[4]

See AKISH, KISH

Variants

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐁𐐘𐐉𐐟 (eɪɡɒʃ)

Notes


  1. Alan R. Millard, “Abraham,” in ed. David N. Freedman, Anchor Bible Dictionary ((New York: Doubleday, 1992), 1:38.
  2. E. Meyers, ed., Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1997), 1:85-86, 5:132.
  3. Hayim Tawil, An Akkadian Lexical Companion for Biblical Hebrew (Jersey City, NJ: KTAV, 2009), 23-4.
  4. Tikva Frymer-Kensky, In the Wake of the Goddesses (New York: Free Press, 1992), 30-1, 67, 78.