BATH

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Biblical noun 1. Liquid capacity-measure (2 Nephi 15:10 = Isaiah 5:10)

Etymology

This unit of liquid measure appears once in the ISAIAH section of the Book of Mormon but is never given as a separate unit of measure, PN, or GN, in the Book of Mormon.

The name BATH is the equivalent of the Hebrew bat “bath-measure” (1 Kings 7:26, 38, Ezekiel 45:10-14, Ezra 7:22) 2 Nephi 15:10 ǁ Isaiah 5:10 (bat ʾeḥāt MT / bat ʾeḥād Qumran/ batos LXX & NT Greek), which is a standard capacity-measure for liquids equivalent to the standard ephah (Heb. ʾêpā) dry-measure of capacity. The ancient Israelite bat was between 20.85 – 21.15 liters, based on the actual capacity of a complete two-handled storage-jar excavated at Lachish (with “bat” written in ink), and dating to the fourth year of the reign of King ZEDEKIAH of Judah. With this William F. Albright’s estimate of the incomplete eighth-century storage-jar (with bat le-melek “royal bath” written on it) which he found at Tell Beit Mirsim and estimated at 22 liters.[1] According to Frank Cross, the ephah/bath in the Hellenistic period was 21.83 liters.

See EPHAH.

Variants

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐒𐐈𐐛 (bæθ)

Notes


  1. The Excavation of Tell Beit Mirsim, III: The Iron Age, AASOR 21–22. (New Haven: American Schools of Oriental Research, 1943).
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