AKISH

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Jaredite PN 1. Son of KIMNOR (Ether 8:10, 11 (x2), 13, 14 (x2), 15 (x2), 17 (x2); 9:1, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11 (x3), 12 (x2))
Jaredite GN 2. Wilderness near the plains of AGOSH and HESHLON (Ether 14:3, 4, 14)

Etymology

Until possible language affinities for JAREDITE names can be determined, all suggestions for etymologies of JAREDITE names must remain more speculative than substantive. With that caveat, the onomasticon does offer etymologies for some JAREDITE names, especially if it is possible that some JAREDITE names were translated into NEPHITE, or were otherwise related to one or more Semitic languages.

The Jaredite name and word-element KISH appears to have a Jaredite root, though it may not be a separate root in this name. See KISH, KISHKUMEN. KISH is also the name of a major Mesopotamian city near Babylon (RFS). AKISH and AGOSH may be possible by-forms of each other.

The PN Ikausu appears in the ASSYRIAN annals of Esarhaddon and Ashurbanipal. The HEBREW PN Ikkesh, cited in 2 Samuel 23:26 and 1 Chronicles 11:28; 27:9, is from the HEBREW root ʿqš, "twist, pervert" (RFS & JAT) and would be a very acceptable name for a wilderness (RFS). The biblical PN Achish, cited in 1 Samuel 21:10 (and in chapters 27-29 passim), is the name of the PHILISTINE king of Gath (as well as the PN of a seventh century B.C. ruler of Ekron, not otherwise cited in the Old Testament) and has been connected with the Aegean name Achish = Ikausu. [1] AKISH is also, according to Nibley, the Egypto-Hittite name for Cyprus [2]

Variants

Deseret Alphabet: 𐐁𐐗𐐆𐐟 (eɪkɪʃ)

Notes


  1. See S. Gittin, in Barry M. Gittlen, ed., Sacred Time, Sacred Place: Archaeology and the Religion of Israel (Winona Lake, IN: Eisenbrauns, 2002), 115.
  2. Nibley, Hugh, Lehi in the Desert, chapter 2 = CWHN 5:32, n. 14; id. An Approach to the Book of Mormon, lesson 22 = CWHN 6:289, n. 31.
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